When You Should Take The GMAT Again


When You Should Take The GMAT Again: a blog about when to retake the GMAT, knowing your options and requirements to retake and advice for the test.

When You Should Take The GMAT Again: a blog about when to retake the GMAT, knowing your options and requirements to retake and advice for the test.

When You Should Take The GMAT Again: a blog about when to retake the GMAT, knowing your options and requirements to retake and advice for the test.

When You Should Take The GMAT Again: a blog about when to retake the GMAT, knowing your options and requirements to retake and advice for the test.

When You Should Take The GMAT Again: a blog about when to retake the GMAT, knowing your options and requirements to retake and advice for the test.

When You Should Take The GMAT Again: a blog about when to retake the GMAT, knowing your options and requirements to retake and advice for the test.

When You Should Take The GMAT Again: a blog about when to retake the GMAT, knowing your options and requirements to retake and advice for the test.

When You Should Take The GMAT Again

“I took the GMAT once and scored a 590. I was wondering if I should take it again. How much do you think I would need to improve to get into a top business school?”

This is one of the most common questions we are asked at mbaMission. After all, test preparation can be expensive and time consuming, so it often makes sense to try to get it right the first time! But that is not always the case.

There is no simple answer to this question, but here are some general thoughts:

If your score is above the average score for the schools you want to attend, then there may not be much benefit in taking the test again. If you are applying to top ten programs, for example, and your score is in the mid-600s, then you might consider retaking if you think you could improve by more than 30 points, as this would raise your score into the next range (i.e., from 651-660 to 661-690). However, if your score is already 710 or higher, then you will probably not benefit from taking the exam again unless you have a lot of extra time on your hands! In fact, some schools

There are a lot of factors that go into deciding if you should take the GMAT again. The first, and most obvious question is, do you need to?

Considering the two main reasons for taking the GMAT again:

If your score was lower than a school’s average (or required minimum), then yes, you probably do need to retake it. If your score fell into the average range for the school, however, retaking the test might not be necessary. However, if your score was on the very low end of their average range, it may be worth it to try and improve.

The other reason people consider retaking the test is that they just didn’t feel like they did their best. This can be hard to judge on your own; some people get nervous or have off days when they take tests and others get used to testing pretty quickly. If you think you could’ve done better, it’s worth considering taking it again.

You can retake the test after 16 days so there is no rush in this decision. You will have time to review your options and consider what would be best for your situation.

When you should retake the GMAT depends on how happy you are with your score, whether you want to apply to a certain school and the admission requirements of that school.

How happy are you with your score?

If your score falls within the range of average scores at the schools you want to attend, then there is no reason to retake it. The same goes for if your score is a little bit below average but still in a good range. There is also no reason to retake it if your score is above average (or even exceptional) for the school. However, if your score is below average by a large margin or if you have many other exceptional aspects about yourself, then there may be a good reason to take it again.

Do you want to apply to a certain school?

The GMAT is important for admission into business schools and an average or below-average score can hurt your chances of getting accepted. To boost your chances of getting into a certain school, try retaking the GMAT again if you can raise your score by 30 points or more. A 30 point increase increases your chance of admission into many schools by 5%. If you’re not sure whether or not this will work for you, check out some statistics about acceptance rates at

THE TIMING OF GMAT TEST RETAKES:

There is a lot of mystery surrounding when you should retake the GMAT. Should I retake if I scored a 650? A 700? What about a 750?

The mystery stems from the fact that there is not a clear cut guide for when you should re-take. While some students might be able to justify taking the test again, others may not see the value in it. The following article discusses all aspects of retaking the GMAT, and hopefully helps give you some solid guidance on if and when you should consider retaking the GMAT.

The following is what this article will cover:

Reasons to Retake the GMAT

Minimum Scores for MBA Programs

When Should You Retake?

What Score Can I Get with Additional Study?

How has my Verbal score changed?

How has my Quant score changed?

How has my IR score changed?

What Score Can I Get with Additional Study?

So when should you retake the GMAT? Here are some questions that will help you decide.

Did I prepare enough?

For most students, the answer to this question is no. Sure, there are a few people who achieve their target score without putting in a lot of effort. But if this is you, then congratulations: you’re an outlier! The majority of test-takers will have to put in a significant amount of time and energy to get their desired score. If your score isn’t where you want it to be—and you didn’t work as hard as you could have—then consider retaking the exam.

Was I lucky?

There is an old adage that goes, “the harder I work, the luckier I get”. In my experience, this rings true on the GMAT as well. There isn’t much room for luck on the GMAT: every question has only one right answer and no wiggle room for interpretation. However, there is a little bit of room for circumstance. Test day nerves can affect your performance on the test; distractions around you can affect your performance; even a slight cold or change of routine can affect your performance. If any of these

The Graduate Management Admission Test (GMAT) is a standardized test that many business schools use as part of their admissions process. The GMAT is a computer adaptive test, meaning that the questions are chosen based on your previous answers. Because of this, you will see harder questions if you choose correct answers and easier questions if you choose incorrect answers. Right or wrong, you will be given an answer to move on to the next question.

The total time for the test is 3 hours and 30 minutes (205 minutes). This includes an optional break of 8 minutes before Section 5 Analytical Writing Assessment. The total testing time is 4 hours including breaks. Take a look at our breakdown of timing for each section below:

Analytical Writing Assessment – Analysis of an Argument

30 minutes

Integrated Reasoning

30 minutes

Quantitative Reasoning

62 minutes (37 Questions)

Verbal Reasoning

65 minutes (41 Questions)


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