jQuery Templates A Template-Driven Approach gives you smart tags and helpers to create awesome websites. Here’s Why it Rips Your Competitors a New One


jQuery Templates: A Template-Driven Approach gives you smart tags and helpers to create awesome websites. Here’s Why it Rips Your Competitors a New One: Need we say more?

jQuery Templates: A Template-Driven Approach gives you smart tags and helpers to create awesome websites. Here’s Why it Rips Your Competitors a New One: Need we say more?

jQuery Templates: A Template-Driven Approach gives you smart tags and helpers to create awesome websites. Here’s Why it Rips Your Competitors a New One: Need we say more?

jQuery Templates: A Template-Driven Approach gives you smart tags and helpers to create awesome websites. Here’s Why it Rips Your Competitors a New One: Need we say more?

jQuery Templates: A Template-Driven Approach gives you smart tags and helpers to create awesome websites. Here’s Why it Rips Your Competitors a New One: Need we say more?

jQuery Templates: A Template-Driven Approach gives you smart tags and helpers to create awesome websites. Here’s Why it Rips Your Competitors a New One: Need we say more?

jQuery Templates: A Template-Driven Approach gives you smart tags and helpers to create awesome websites. Here’s Why it Rips Your Competitors a New One: Need we say more?**

jQuery Templates: A Template-Driven Approach gives you smart tags and helpers to create awesome websites. Here’s Why it Rips Your Competitors a New One: Need we say more?

jQuery Templates: A Template-Driven Approach gives you smart tags and helpers to create awesome websites. Here’s Why it Rips Your Competitors a New One: Need we say more?

Open Source jQuery Templates

The goal of jQuery Templates is to give you a way to write a template once and populate it with different data sets as needed. The template engine lets you create the template in HTML, but then use some simple syntax to allow you to pull out information from your data source and add it into the markup of your page. In this demo I will show you how to use templates with three different data sources: JSON, XML, and an RSS feed.

You can follow along with this tutorial by downloading the Pencil Code below. If you would like to see the finished demo click here. Below are some examples of what we will be doing in this tutorial.

Pencil Code is a browser-based programming environment.

Pencil Code is a collaborative programming environment with an editor, a chatroom, and real-time JavaScript execution.

Pencil Code has been designed for teachers and students of all ages. It has been used to teach middle schoolers, high schoolers, and college students.

Pencil Code can run in either the JavaScript or CoffeeScript programming languages. The code you type runs immediately in the browser. If it has errors, they are reported in the console window at the bottom of the screen.

The Pencil Code editor is complex enough to be useful, yet simple enough to be accessible to beginners. The editor offers text completion and hints for CoffeeScript as well as JavaScript.

The Pencil Code chatroom lets you communicate with others without leaving your own work behind. The chatroom shows what other people are doing, and what they are chatting about, alongside your own work.

Pencil Code is open source software released under the MIT License (enclosed).

// **Pencil Code** is a collaborative programming environment for creating art and animations.

// It’s designed to be both easy and fun to use, so you can give your creativity free rein.

// Pencil Code is based on [CoffeeScript](http://coffeescript.org/), but it’s easy to learn even if you haven’t programmed before. You’ll find a gentle introduction in the [tutorial](/tutorial) and [reference guide](/reference).

// A live version of this program is at [http://pencilcode.net/edit/pencilcode](http://pencilcode.net/edit/pencilcode).

// If you are new to programming and want to learn more, please start with the [tutorial](/tutorial).

A thousand years ago, people in Europe were putting on plays that started “Once upon a time…” and ended “They all lived happily ever after.” Those stories had the same structure then as stories do now. They still work.

But what if you’re writing a story that isn’t about some random prince who marries some random princess and then they have some random kids? What if you want to write about something more interesting, like the history of the collapse of the Roman Empire? Or about your own life? Then it’s not obvious how to structure it.

Why is that? Maybe because we’re used to reading novels and watching movies, where the writer doesn’t control how we experience time. When you read a novel, you can start at the beginning or in the middle; you can skip around or read every word; you can stop at any time and pick up again later. That’s not true of real life. If you want to understand what happened in Rome in AD 400, you need to start by figuring out what was going on in Rome in AD 399. And if you want to understand your own life, its best to start with childhood memories. You need to tell stories linearly, but most events don’t happen linearly.

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