The Best Java Features


The Best Java Features: a blog around Java’s best features, Also known as “Javey Hall of Fame”.

The Javey Hall of Fame is a list of the most useful and beautiful features of the language. The list will be updated from time to time, but it will always stay at 10 items. The main objective of this list is to provide developers with a reference for what Java has to offer and help them understand why Java is a great language.

This list was inspired by Robert Martin’s “Top 10 List” from his book Clean Code (I borrowed the idea and applied it to Java), and Joshua Bloch’s “Effective Java Reloaded” presentation (I borrowed some of the content).

The Best Java Features: a blog around Java’s best features, Also known as “Javey Hall of Fame”.

I’m looking for the best Java features. Not only the ones that are the most used but also ones that are less known but really useful. I want to collect them all and make a blog about it.

If you want to submit your favorite feature, please fill out this form. I will then select the most interesting ones and publish a post about it.

As a developer I’ve been using Java for a long time now, however I still learn new things about the language every day and that is one of my favorite aspects of our job: learning new things and improving myself. Of course we can’t know everything about Java, there is too much to learn! But knowing a lot of functionalities and use cases of the language allows us to be more efficient at work because we have more tools available in our tool box.

The goal of this blog is to provide some new tools in your tool box and maybe also give you some ideas on how you can improve your code by using them.

The Best Java Features: a blog around Java’s best features, Also known as “Javey Hall of Fame”.

The Java language is a huge language and it’s easy to get lost in the many APIs, libraries and frameworks. I also have an extensive experience with Java and I have decided to share with you my favorite parts of the language and why I love them.

I’ll be blogging about my favorite features, APIs, design patterns, tips & tricks and much more.

The Best Java Features: a blog around Java’s best features, Also known as “Javey Hall of Fame”.

Although the concept is not new (I remember reading about it in blogs like c2.com and TheServerSide.com), I believe that the current “Java hype” is the perfect moment to launch such a new blog.

As there are several Java bloggers who have their own version of it, I recommend you to read also this introduction by Venkat Subramaniam and this one by Philip Wadler.

The idea behind this blog is simple: every month, we will select and explain the best feature in Java: the most elegant or interesting, the most useful or unexpected… You can submit your own suggestion (see below) and vote for the selected one or propose an alternative: at the end of the month, we will post all your suggestions (and votes).

The first selection will be posted on January 1st 2007.

Java is the most popular language in the world. Java has a big community and it evolves very fast.

Java has many features and it’s not easy to remember all of them, there are a lot of things to learn.

It’s important to know what are the best features that Java offers us. I don’t mean the best feature for your project. I mean the best feature for you as a developer, something that can help you work faster and better, something that can make you more productive.

The Best Java Features: a blog around Java’s best features, Also known as “Javey Hall of Fame”.

The following articles give you some insights into Java’s best features, Also known as “Javey Hall of Fame”.

The following articles are in no particular order and I’ll be adding more articles as I find them.

1. The Best Java Features: Concurrency Utilities

2. The Best Java Features: Optional

3. The Best Java Features: IO Streams (Java 8)

4. The Best Java Features: NIO2 Paths

5. The Best Java Features: NIO2 Files

6. The Best Java Features: Reflection/Annotations

Visual Studio Code is a lightweight but powerful source code editor which runs on your desktop and is available for Windows, macOS and Linux. It comes with built-in support for JavaScript, TypeScript and Node.js and has a rich ecosystem of extensions for other languages (such as C++, C


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