A Beginner’s Guide to GitHub


This article is all about getting you started, so we won’t talk much about topics like version control, pull requests, and branching. We’re going to focus on getting you signed up and ready to go.

Signing Up

Signing up is incredibly easy.

Navigate to github.com and click on “Sign Up” at the top right of the page. This will lead you to a page that asks for your username, email address and password. Once that’s completed, you should receive an email from GitHub confirming your account (in my case it took less than a minute).

Getting Your Profile Found

Now that you have an account, let’s add a few things to make it personal (and searchable by recruiters). First things first: set up your profile picture. To do this, click the avatar dropdown in the upper right-hand corner of the screen and select “Settings.” Once there, scroll down until you see Gravatar under Personal Settings and follow their instructions for setting up your profile picture from either a website or social media account (I like Twitter). You may also want to fill out other information found on this page such as your name and location which will show

This article was written by David Winterbottom, a software developer who he writes about technology, programming languages and software engineering. His work has been featured in a number of online publications including InfoWorld, TechCrunch and The Next Web.

GitHub is the world’s largest code repository hosting over 100 million projects. It is the largest open source community on the planet and it is growing every day.

As a beginner to GitHub you may be wondering what all the hype is about? Well, GitHub allows you to host your code remotely from your local development environment so that you can easily share it with other developers.Over 7 million people use GitHub to build amazing things together.

If you are starting out as a developer then getting involved in an open source community is a great way to learn new programming techniques, pick up new technologies and even find a mentor or two!

So let’s start by signing up for an account at https://github.com/join

In this article we’ll look at what GitHub is, how to use it and why you should start using it. Let’s begin by answering the questions “what is GitHub?” and “why should I use GitHub?”

What is GitHub?

GitHub is a code hosting platform for version control and collaboration. It gives you and others a way to work together on projects from anywhere.

This tutorial teaches you GitHub essentials like repositories, branches, commits, and Pull Requests. You’ll create your own Hello World repository and learn GitHub’s Pull Request workflow, a popular way to create and review code.

If you’re a developer, you’ve probably heard about GitHub, a version control repository that makes it easier for you to keep track of changes in your code.

If you’re not a developer, though, or if you don’t work with other developers, then chances are you have no idea what I’m talking about. That’s okay! I was confused too at first. Maybe someone just told you that GitHub is the de facto place to share and work on code. Maybe they said it’s the best way to collaborate with others. Maybe they said it would be beneficial to your career. In this article, I hope to answer all the questions you might have about what GitHub is and why it’s useful for anyone who works with code or data (even if only a little bit).

What is GitHub?

GitHub is a code hosting platform for version control and collaboration. It lets you and others work together on projects from anywhere. This tutorial teaches you GitHub essentials like repositories, branches, commits, and Pull Requests. You’ll create your own Hello World repository and learn GitHub’s Pull Request workflow, a popular way to create and review code.

No coding necessary

To complete this tutorial, you need a GitHub.com account and Internet access. You don’t need to know how to code, use the command line, or install Git (the version control software GitHub is built on).

Tip: Open this guide in a separate browser window (or tab) so you can see it while you complete the steps in the tutorial.

GitHub is a web-based hosting service for projects that use the Git revision control system. GitHub allows users to share and collaborate on software development projects. It also serves as a platform for open source projects.

GitHub is an online code repository and has been called the “Facebook for programmers.” It was founded in 2008 by Tom Preston-Werner, Chris Wanstrath, and PJ Hyett. The company has about 300 employees – known as “Hubbers” – and is based in San Francisco.

GitHub was launched in 2008 and used by more than 10 million people to develop software in partnership with 25 million other users. Some of its most well-known users include Facebook, Google, Twitter, Apple, PayPal, LinkedIn and Netflix.

In this beginner-friendly article, you’ll learn what GitHub is, how to use it, and how to set up Git.

But let’s take a step back and answer the question “What is Version Control?”.

Version control (also known as revision control) is a way to keep a track of the changes in the code so that if something goes wrong, we can make comparisons in different code versions and revert to any previous version that we want.

Imagine you are developing a website and halfway through the project you realize that some recent changes you made created an issue or bug in your website. So, you want to revert to the last version of your website when it was working fine. This is where version control comes into place! In version control systems, every change in the source code (when you save) is referenced with a number or letter code, known as the “revision number”, “revision level” or simply “revision”. So, if anything goes wrong we can revert back to any revision number (i.e., restore any previous version of our project).

This means that every time we save our work (commit), we have a reliable backup of it


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