A Gentle Introduction to Flask


Flask is a microframework for Python based on Werkzeug, Jinja 2 and good intentions. And before you ask: It’s BSD licensed!

Flask is easy to get started and a great way to build web sites and web applications. It’s easy to get your stuff into Flask with the built-in development server, integrated unit testing support, and a handy debugger.

Here’s an example hello world application:

from flask import Flask app = Flask(__name__)@app.route(“/”) def hello(): return “Hello World!”if __name__ == “__main__”: app.run()

Python is a powerful, high-level language that can be used to create android and desktop apps from scratch. Python code is easy to read and understand thus more efficient and in many cases, takes fewer lines of code than other languages.

This tutorial will teach you how to build web applications with python using flask, a microframework for python with great documentation. Flask is a framework that makes it easy to build web applications. It’s built with the python language, which gives it the power and flexibility to do almost anything you want to do.

In this tutorial, we are going to be building a simple blog called “Python Flask Blog App” with CRUD functionalities, that is the ability to create, retrieve, update and delete posts.

Flask is a lightweight web application framework. It is designed to make getting started quick and easy, with the ability to scale up to complex applications. It began as a simple wrapper around Werkzeug and Jinja and has become one of the most popular Python web application frameworks. Flask offers suggestions, but doesn’t enforce any dependencies or project layout. It is up to the developer to choose the tools and libraries they want to use. There are many extensions provided by the community that make adding new functionality easy.

A ‘micro’ framework, Flask aims to keep the core simple but extensible. Flask won’t make many decisions for you, such as what database to use. Those decisions that it does make, such as what templating engine to use, are easy to change. Everything else is up to you, so that Flask can be everything you need and nothing you don’t.

Flask is a web application framework written in Python. Armin Ronacher, who leads an international group of Python enthusiasts named Pocco, develops it. Flask is based on the Werkzeug WSGI toolkit and Jinja2 template engine. Both are Pocco projects.

WSGI has become a standard for Python web application development. Flask uses the location of the module passed here as a starting point when it needs to load associated resources such as template files, which I will cover in Chapter 2.

Now that you have an idea about what Flask is exactly, let’s get it installed!

Flask is a micro web framework written in Python. It is classified as a microframework because it does not require particular tools or libraries. It has no database abstraction layer, form validation, or any other components where pre-existing third-party libraries provide common functions. However, Flask supports extensions that can add application features as if they were implemented in Flask itself. Extensions exist for object-relational mappers, form validation, upload handling, various open authentication technologies and several common framework related tools. Extensions are updated far more regularly than the core Flask program.

Flask is commonly used with MongoDB, which gives it more control over databases and helps developers make changes to their database structure quickly and easily. This is essential for rapid application development (RAD) since the time savings can be significant when compared to other frameworks such as Django.

Since APIs today are at the heart of modern web development, and Flask is a simple yet powerful Python web framework that makes building an API easy and convenient.

Flask’s wide array of extension libraries comes in handy when you want to enhance your app’s functionality without adding unnecessary bloat to your codebase. For instance, if you want to add user authentication (login/logout) to your app,

Flask is a micro-framework for Python based on Werkzeug, Jinja 2 and good intentions. It is a lightweight abstraction that works with your existing ORM/libraries. Flask is intended for getting started very quickly and was developed with best intentions in mind.

Flask is a micro web framework written in Python. It is classified as a microframework because it does not require particular tools or libraries. It has no database abstraction layer, form validation, or any other components where pre-existing third-party libraries provide common functions.

However, Flask supports extensions that can add application features as if they were implemented in Flask itself. Extensions exist for object-relational mappers, form validation, upload handling, various open authentication technologies and several common framework related tools. Extensions are updated far more regularly than the core Flask program.

Flask is a micro web framework written in Python. It is classified as a microframework because it does not require particular tools or libraries (except for some basics standard libraries such as bottom.py). It has no database abstraction layer, form validation, or any other components where pre-existing third-party libraries provide common functions. However, Flask supports extensions that can add application features as if they were implemented in Flask itself. Extensions exist for object-relational mappers, form validation, upload handling, various open authentication technologies and several common framework related tools. Extensions are updated far more regularly than the core Flask program.

A Flask project can be set up in three basic ways:

By installing the flask package using pip:

>$ pip install flask

This will pull the latest version of Flask into your Python environment. Then you would create your application by creating a file named app.py or something similar and entering this code:

>from flask import Flask

>app = Flask(__name__)

>@app.route(‘/’)

>def index():

>return ‘Hello World!’

>if __name__ == ‘__main__’:

>app.run()


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