Introduction to CSS


CSS is a language that describes the style of an HTML document.

CSS describes how HTML elements should be displayed.

This tutorial will teach you CSS from basic to advanced.

What is CSS?

CSS stands for Cascading Style Sheets

Styles define how to display HTML elements

Styles were added to HTML 4.0 to solve a problem

External Style Sheets can save a lot of work

External Style Sheets are stored in CSS files

CSS is used to control the style of a web document in a simple and easy way.

CSS stands for Cascading Style Sheets.

CSS describes how HTML elements are to be displayed on screen, paper, or in other media.

CSS saves a lot of work. It can control the layout of multiple web pages all at once.

External stylesheets are stored in CSS files.

Cascading Style Sheets (CSS) is a simple mechanism for adding style (e.g., fonts, colors, spacing) to Web documents.

CSS is a cornerstone technology of the World Wide Web, alongside HTML and JavaScript.

Web browsers receive HTML documents from a webserver or from local storage and render them into multimedia web pages. HTML describes the structure of a web page semantically and originally included cues for the appearance of the document.

CSS is designed primarily to enable the separation of document content from document presentation, including elements such as the layout, colors, and fonts. This separation can improve content accessibility, provide more flexibility and control in the specification of presentation characteristics, enable multiple HTML pages to share formatting by specifying the relevant CSS in a separate .css file, and reduce complexity and repetition in the structural content (such as by allowing for tableless web design). CSS can also allow the same markup page to be presented in different styles for different rendering methods, such as on-screen, in print, by voice (when read out by a speech-based browser or screen reader) and on Braille-based tactile devices. While the author of a document typically links that document to a CSS style sheet, readers can use a different style sheet.[1]

CSS (Cascading Style Sheets) is a language that’s used to describe the look and formatting of a document written in a markup language. Its most common application is to style web pages written in HTML, but the language can also be applied to any kind of XML document, including SVG and XUL.

CSS has a simple syntax and uses a number of English keywords to specify the names of various style properties. A style sheet consists of a list of rules, with each rule consisting of one or more selectors and a declaration block. In CSS, selectors declare which part of the markup a style applies to by matching tags and attributes in the markup itself.

CSS Rules:

A CSS rule-set consists of a selector and a declaration block:

The selector points to the HTML element you want to style.

The declaration block contains one or more declarations separated by semicolons.

Each declaration includes a CSS property name and a value, separated by a colon.

Cascading Style Sheets (CSS) is a stylesheet language used to describe the presentation of a document written in HTML or XML (including XML dialects such as SVG, MathML or XHTML). CSS describes how elements should be rendered on screen, on paper, in speech, or on other media.

CSS is one of the core languages of the open web and is standardized across web browsers according to the W3C specification.

Developed in levels, CSS1 is now obsolete, CSS2.1 is a recommendation, and CSS3, now split into smaller modules, is progressing on the standardization track.

CSS was designed primarily to enable the separation of document content from document presentation, including elements such as the layout, colors, and fonts. This separation can improve content accessibility, provide more flexibility and control in the specification of presentation characteristics, enable multiple pages to share formatting by specifying the relevant CSS in a separate .css file. It can also allow the same markup page to be presented in different styles for different rendering methods, such as on-screen, in print, by voice (via speech-based browser or screen reader), and on Braille-based tactile devices. It can also be used to allow the web page to display differently depending on

When we write HTML, we use tags to define different parts of the page. When we want to style these parts, we use CSS.

CSS stands for Cascading Style Sheets.

In other words, CSS is a set of rules that tell the browser how to display each HTML element.

For example, to change the color of the text in our paragraph tag, we could add the following CSS:

p {

color: red;

}

This tells the browser that all paragraph tags should have red text. The browser will then apply this rule to all paragraphs on the page.


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