WordPress Errors – A guide to knowing your WordPress errors and how you can fix them.


WordPress Errors – A guide to knowing your WordPress errors and how you can fix them.

Errors are a natural part of coding and development, but that doesn’t make them any less annoying. Especially when you’re stuck on a deadline and your site is crashing because of an error you have no idea how to fix.

When you work with WordPress, there are many different types of errors that can crop up, from simple typos in your code to complex server issues. In this article, we’ll take a look at some of the most common WordPress errors and how you can fix them.

Before we begin, it’s important to note that these methods will only work if you have access to your website’s files and database. If you’re using a managed hosting service like WP Engine or Kinsta, then you won’t be able to do this. You’ll need to contact your hosting provider instead.

WordPress Errors – A guide to knowing your WordPress errors and how you can fix them.

WordPress is an extremely popular open source CMS (content management system) that allows its users to easily build beautiful websites, blogs, or apps. The platform has over 60 million users worldwide, and is used by some of the biggest brands in the world.

While WordPress is a very powerful content management system, it does have its own fair share of errors. Today we’ll take a look at some of the most common WordPress errors and how you can fix them yourself.

WordPress Errors – A guide to knowing your WordPress errors and how you can fix them.

When working with WordPress, it’s inevitable that sometime in the process you will run into some error message or another. These error messages are usually very descriptive, but can be quite confusing as well. How do you know what to do when you come across these errors? Well, this is what this article is all about. We will talk about some of the most common errors and their possible solutions.

Parse Error

WordPress uses programming languages like PHP to perform its functions. Some of the files that make up WordPress contain code that tells the computer to do certain tasks when it sees the words “if”, “else”, and “while”. The computer can only follow these instructions if they are written in a language that it understands. If there is one extra or missing character somewhere in the code, it may cause a parse error. In other words, when there is an extra or missing character in the code, it will prevent the computer from being able to read and understand the code properly which ends up causing a Parse Error.

A guide to WordPress errors and how you can fix them.

Understanding WordPress error messages and what they mean is really important for a successful WordPress website. Some errors are critical, some not so much. However, if you know what an error message means and how to fix it, you’re in better shape than most new WordPress users. That’s why we’ve created this guide to help you out.

WordPress is an amazing and powerful platform, but as with any software, it can also run into errors. Errors are something that you will inevitably have to deal with as a WordPress user. They can throw you off and make you worry, but most of them are quite easy to fix.

In this article, I’m going to cover the most common WordPress errors that you may encounter when using the platform. For each one, I’ll tell you what causes it and how you can fix it.

The White Screen of Death

The White Screen of Death (WSoD) is an error that gives you no information about what caused it. It just shows a blank screen. This could be caused by several things:

A theme function has crashed, causing your website to crash.

A plugin is broken and is causing your website to crash.

You’ve exhausted all of your memory limits.

How To Fix It: There are several ways to fix the WSoD issue:

Check if a theme or plugin has crashed – If your website was working before and then suddenly stopped working after activating a new theme or installing a new plugin, this might be the reason why. To check if this is the culprit, deactivate all plugins (you can do this by

One of the most frustrating parts of running your own website can be when you encounter an error message, and you are stuck trying to figure out how to solve it. This is all too common for WordPress, which provides its own unique error messages that sometimes seem like a foreign language.

The good news is that there are only a few common errors with WordPress, and many of them have easy fixes. To help you get started, we’ll walk through the most common WordPress errors and some suggested solutions in this guide.


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