GitHub and Technical Writing


GitHub and Technical Writing is a blog about why technical writers need to learn and understand GitHub.

Apostle Paul’s Epistles, which are the foundation of today’s Christian theology, were written to the early churches in Rome, Corinth, Galatia, Ephesus, Philippi, Colossae and Thessaloniki. In his epistles Paul is addressing specific issues that were a cause for concern in the early churches.

This is a blog about why technical writers need to learn and understand GitHub.

I have been a technical writer for over 10 years. My background is in software documentation. And I just recently started writing for GitHub (well, the company).

When I first started working at GitHub, I had no idea what Git was, or how to use it (or what it even stood for). And if you’re reading this blog, then perhaps you’re like me–a technical writer who has little experience with Git.

If you want to work in tech, not understanding Git is like being an accountant who can’t use Excel or a chef who can’t cook! It’s a necessity! So why don’t more technical writers learn Git? Or start using it?

This is a blog about why technical writers need to learn and understand GitHub.

GitHub is a service that provides remote access to Git repositories.

This blog is written by a technical writer who hasn’t worked with GitHub.

I don’t know this subject, so I’m writing this blog to learn more about GitHub.

I read that GitHub supports Git, a version control system developed by Linus Torvalds, the creator of Linux.

I’m writing this blog post because I think technical writers need to learn and understand GitHub. Why? Because we’re all using it. Even if you don’t use GitHub directly, you probably use some web service that integrates with GitHub.

I’m writing this blog post because I think technical writers need to learn and understand GitHub. Why? Because we’re all using it. Even if you don’t use GitHub directly, you probably use some web service that integrates with GitHub.

I’m a technical writer who just started working on a DevOps team. I have no idea what I’m doing. I’ve never written code before, and I’ve never used GitHub. But my team uses GitHub every day to track changes in the software they develop, so it’s important that I learn how to use it.

I also want to do more than just use Github as a user. I want to be able to work with the code that is being developed by the developers on my team, so I need to understand how GitHub works and how it fits into their development process. I think GitHub can be a powerful tool for managing documentation projects as well, so it’s important that I get up to speed quickly.

This blog is about my journey from noob to expert (or at least “competent”). It’s about why technical writers need to learn and understand GitHub and other developer tools like Git and Jira, and it’s about how we can use these tools to collaborate more effectively with developers and other stakeholders in our documentation projects.

If you’re a developer or technical writer who wants to learn more about GitHub and other developer tools, this blog is for you!

I figured it out! You can write a blog in the GitHub UI. I must admit, when I first discovered that you could write blogs on GitHub, I was extremely skeptical. I’m not a developer. I don’t do much work in the command line. And why would anyone want to create a blog using GitHub?

But now, after spending some time looking into it and digging around in the docs, I actually think it’s pretty awesome. In fact, creating this blog post in the GitHub UI has given me an idea for my next blog post:

How to Write Your Technical Documentation Using GitHub (and Github Pages)

This next post will be about how you can use GitHub as your CMS (content management system), whether you use Markdown to write your content or not. Stay tuned!

Let me tell you a story:

My son is 16 years old and he asked me to teach him how to code. I am a software engineer, so I thought it would be a great idea. At that time I had been working with GitHub for three years and I was always amazed at the possibilities that came with it. So, when my son asked how to code, the first thing I told him was “Look! Now you are going to know Git and GitHub.”


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