Lint for JavaScript and Other Scripts – The Definitive Guide


jslint.js is a JavaScript program that looks at JavaScript programs and tells you what is wrong with them. It is designed to be highly configurable and easy to use.

The basic idea is that you first tell jslint about all of the things that you might have got wrong in your program and then you run it. jslint will examine your program source code, one statement at a time, and will complain whenever it thinks that you have made a mistake.

jslint also encourages good practices. For example, jslint wants variables to start with lower case letters, so that it can reserve upper case names for constructors.

JSLint is a JavaScript program that looks for problems in JavaScript programs. It is a code quality tool.

JSLint takes a JavaScript source and scans it. If it finds a problem, it returns a message describing the problem and an approximate location within the source. The problem is not necessarily a syntax error, although it often is. JSLint looks at some style conventions as well as structural problems. It does not prove that your program is correct. It just provides another set of eyes to help spot problems.

The goals of JSLint are:

To encourage good programming practices through application of a strict coding standard;

To expose bad practices so they can be eliminated;

To improve your code’s portability by allowing you to spot non-portable features quickly;

To warn you about potential ambiguities and mistakes;

To improve your code’s compression by flagging redundant code early in the development process.

JSLint is a static code analysis tool used in software development for checking if JavaScript source code complies with coding rules. It is provided primarily as a browser-based web application accessible through the URL http://www.jslint.com, but an offline version is also distributed in the form of a Node.js command line tool that can be installed using npm.

JSLint was developed by Douglas Crockford who maintains the tool and publishes occasional reports about its maintenance and development on his blog.

JSLint is a community-driven tool to detect errors and potential problems in JavaScript code. It is a code quality tool.

JSLint takes a JavaScript source and scans it. If it finds a problem, it returns a message describing the problem and an approximate location within the source. The problem is not necessarily a syntax error, although it often is. JSLint looks at some style conventions as well as structural problems. It does not prove that your program is correct. It just provides another set of eyes to help spot problems.

The messages that JSLint produces will be helpful to experienced programmers but may not be as helpful to beginners. Still, if you use JSLint as a learning tool, you will find that your programs will get better over time.

If you read this document carefully and follow all of the advice, your programs will definitely be better than they would have been otherwise. You should read this document even if you are using one of the wrappers listed below because there are some options that only affect JSLint itself and not the wrappers.

“JSLint is a JavaScript program that looks for problems in JavaScript programs. It is a code quality tool.”

In the same way that JSLint looks for problems in your code, you can use it to look for problems in your documentation. In fact, we’re using JSLint on this very page!

This article is a guide for JSLint, the JavaScript Code Quality Tool. It is intended to provide an introduction to using the tool and give some insight into the more advanced features that it offers.

JSLint was created by Douglas Crockford as a tool to help improve JavaScript coding practices and overall code quality. The project has been greatly influenced by the book “JavaScript: The Good Parts” by Douglas Crockford.

JSLint is not an alternative to a unit testing framework like Jasmine or QUnit but should be used in addition to these tools. JSLint can be run directly in the browser or on the server side using Node.js.

JSLint is an open-source tool written by Douglas Crockford. It is used to detect errors and problems in JavaScript code and to enforce coding conventions.

The most important advantage of using JSLint is that it enforces coding conventions and prevents you from making common mistakes. If you are working on a team, you can configure your coding guidelines inside JSLint. You can also configure how strict the linter should be.

Here is a list of common errors that JSLint will report:

• Unused and undefined variables

• Evaluating the same thing twice

• Mismatched quotes or parentheses

• Confusing pluses and minuses for string concatenation and subtraction

• Implied globals – undeclared global variables, like window or document, which will not throw an error but may cause problems later if they are overwritten by mistake

• Undeclared functions (functions not defined as part of an object, like var myFunc = function() {})


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